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Effects of stocking density on survival, growth and biochemical composition of cultured mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Lamarck 1819) from an offshore submerged longline system

October 2, 2013

This study examined an offshore submerged mussel longline system, in the Black Sea, from May 2009 to May 2010. The system was allowed 1 year for spat collection. After a 1-year spat collection period, some spat collectors were left untouched (NS), and some spat collectors were grazed and socked (S) for a grow-out study in May 2009. The effects of stocking density on the growth and survival of the S and NS mussels were examined. The biochemical composition of the mussels was also determined. Environmental factors including temperature, salinity, chlorophyll a, total suspended matter, inorganic matter and organic matter were monitored monthly during the experimental period. In May 2010, the mean length and live weight of the S and NS mussels were 60.46 ± 0.60 mm and 53.34 ± 0.37 mm, respectively, and 20.50 ± 0.50 g and 13.11 ± 0.26 g respectively. Mean moisture and ash were 82.35 ± 0.47% and 6.67 ± 0.44% respectively. Mean carbohydrate, protein and lipid were 27.74 ± 2.40%, 57.68 ± 2.15% and 7.91 ± 0.68% respectively. These results indicate that a submerged offshore mussel culture system in the Black Sea can be commercially convenient. In addition, stock management via thinning out of the spat can considerably increase the marketable size of mussels, reduce harvest time and produce better growth.

Karayücel S, Çelik M Y, Karayücel I, Öztürk R,  Eyüboğlu B, in press. Effects of stocking density on survival, growth and biochemical composition of cultured mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis, Lamarck 1819) from an offshore submerged longline system, Aquaculture Research, 2013, doi:10.1111/are.12291. Article.

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